Author Topic: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?  (Read 904 times)

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Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #10 on: 07 May, 2021, 08:07:51 AM »
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a.flynn

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This is an interesting topic!  Isn't there something in physics that says a rapidly rotating something will start moving in a straight line even in a vacuum or near-vacuum conditions?  A bit like spinning top or gyro.

Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #11 on: 08 May, 2021, 04:16:20 PM »
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ATH019

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Yes, I think there is.  Well said!



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Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #12 on: 09 May, 2021, 08:08:26 AM »
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blag-it Admin

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This is an interesting topic!  Isn't there something in physics that says a rapidly rotating something will start moving in a straight line even in a vacuum or near-vacuum conditions?  A bit like spinning top or gyro.
A very interesting topic.  Not sure as to the point though.  Very near to or within a strong gravitational body or force they might move in a straight line initially in a vacuum, but don't know about deep space conditions.  In any case, a spinning top or gyro isn't an aerofoil and visa-versa.


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Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #13 on: 10 May, 2021, 10:56:27 AM »
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LISTR-93

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This is it!  A gyroscope or spinning top might move in a straight line if spinning very fast due to gravitational attraction, but they're not aerofoils so not the same as helicopter rotors! 

Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #14 on: 11 May, 2021, 11:14:31 PM »
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blag-it Admin

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No, not the same at all.  The former would move in a straight line initially if spinning very fast due to angular momentum, although in deep-space or zero gravity probably not, it would just stay fixed where it is.  The latter needs an atmospheric density that's great enough to pull against.



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