Author Topic: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?  (Read 491 times)

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How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« on: 13 March, 2021, 11:30:08 AM »
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LISTR-93

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How can helicopter type drones fly on Mars considering that the Martian atmospheric pressure is far less than the Earth's? ???

Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #1 on: 13 March, 2021, 01:07:51 PM »
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cybernut

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Don't know exactly but I'm guessing they would have ballast of some kind to increase the weight so as to compensate for the lower pressure.  How much ballast/weight would be based on how much less the atmospheric pressure of Mars is.

Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #2 on: 14 March, 2021, 01:25:28 AM »
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LISTR-93

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Yea I get that, I can see how that would 'hold it down', but isn't the atmospheric make-up completely different?  I just don't see how a rotary wing would work in it even if added weight would keep it more stable...

Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #3 on: 15 March, 2021, 03:06:15 AM »
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blag-it Admin

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Yea I get that, I can see how that would 'hold it down', but isn't the atmospheric make-up completely different?  I just don't see how a rotary wing would work in it even if added weight would keep it more stable...
This is a good point and considering that the martian atmosphere is over 95% carbon dioxide, it's difficult to see how any winged craft would work in it.



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Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #4 on: 03 April, 2021, 11:59:25 AM »
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ATH019

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Wondering the same.  Maybe they discovered that rotary winged craft like a helicopter could work in different atmospheric compositions.



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Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #5 on: 04 April, 2021, 12:02:40 PM »
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LISTR-93

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Wondering the same.  Maybe they discovered that rotary winged craft like a helicopter could work in different atmospheric compositions.



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What would the rotor blades pull against though.  Resistance would be too low I think, could be wrong...

Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #6 on: 17 April, 2021, 01:56:05 AM »
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ATH019

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TBH I have no real idea, was just guessing they might have discovered that heli's can work in different atmospheres...



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Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #7 on: 04 May, 2021, 10:23:50 AM »
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LISTR-93

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TBH I have no real idea, was just guessing they might have discovered that heli's can work in different atmospheres...



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Yep, could be that, but if I remember my science lessons a long time ago correctly, the martian atmosphere is also very hot during the daytime because it's so thin and during the night time it's well below zero, a bit like desert conditions multiplied many times.  It would be like trying to fly a helicopter through a very hot or cold vacuum. 

Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #8 on: 05 May, 2021, 08:54:29 AM »
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ATH019

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Mars does have an atmosphere though, so not a vacuum.



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Re: How can 'helicopters' fly on Mars?

« Reply #9 on: 06 May, 2021, 09:36:53 AM »
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LISTR-93

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A very thin one, compared to earth I'd say it's virtually a vacuum... ::)